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Latest Round-Up of Obama Poll Ratings by State

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The latest round-up of President Obama's job approval or favorability ratings by state updates or adds Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

Notable in this update is the key state of Ohio where the percentage of those who disapprove of Obama's performance is the highest since he took office.
Alabama

SurveyUSA, Dec. 11-13
2008 election: McCain 60 percent, Obama 38 percent

SurveyUSA says 61 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 35 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. Independents, who make up 23 percent of the sample, disapprove by 75 percent to 21 percent. Obama's support among fellow Democrats is only 63 percent. White voters (73 percent of the sample) disapprove by 75 percent to 21 percent while black voters (24 percent of the sample) approve by 81 percent to 18 percent. This is little changed from polls done in November and September.
Alaska
2008 election: McCain 59 percent, Obama 38 percent
PPP says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 37 percent approve, with 8 percent undecided.
Arizona
Rasmussen Reports, Jan. 20

2008 election: McCain 53 percent, Obama 45 percent
Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 43 percent approve. Fifty-nine percent oppose the health care reform proposal he and congressional Democrats are pushing (with 53 percent strongly opposed) while 38 percent favor it. Forty-two percent believe the economy is getting worse, 29 percent say it is improving and 25 percent say it's about the same.
Arkansas
2008 election: McCain 59 percent, Obama 39 percent
Rasmussen says that 66 percent disapprove of the way Obama is doing his job (with 59 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 33 percent approve. Fifty-six percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 31 percent say they are about the same and 11 percent say they are better.
PPP says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 38 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Sixty-one percent oppose the health care proposals he is advocating while 30 percent support them, with 9 percent undecided. Independents (32 percent of the sample) disapprove of Obama's performance by a 68 percent to 28 percent margin and they oppose the health care reform legislation by 72 percent to 20 percent.

California
Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 15, SurveyUSA Feb. 12-14

2008 election: Obama 61 percent, McCain 37 percent
Rasmussen says 57 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 42 percent disapprove. Forty-nine percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 34 percent rate them about the same and 16 percent say they are getting better.

SurveyUSA says 59 percent approve of Obama's performance while 38 percent do not, with 3 percent undecided.
Colorado
2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 45 percent
Rasmussen says 53 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 47 percent approve. Forty-four percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 29 percent rate them about the same and 23 percent say they are getting better.
Research 2000 says 47 percent view Obama unfavorably, 46 percent regard him favorably and 7 percent are undecided.
Connecticut
2008 election: Obama 60 percent, McCain 38 percent
Rasmussen says 51 percent approve of Obama's performance while 49 percent disapprove. Forty-five percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 37 percent say they are about the same and 16 percent say they are getting better.
Research 2000 says 63 percent view Obama favorably while 30 percent see him unfavorably, with 7 percent undecided.
Quinnipiac says 55 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 41 percent disapprove, but notes that it is his lowest ever in the state.
PPP says voters approve of Obama's performance by 54 percent to 38 percent with 8 percent undecided. They support the health care overhaul he is advocating by 47 percent to 43 percent with 10 percent undecided, with the poll's 4.3 point margin of error.

Delaware
Daily Kos/Research 2000, Feb. 22-24; Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 22; Brown University, Feb. 9-12

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 37 percent
Research 2000 says 59 percent view Obama favorably and 36 percent unfavorably, with 5 percent undecided.

Rasmussen says 51 percent approve of Obama's performance while 48 percent disapprove. Fifty-one percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 28 percent say they are about the same and 18 percent say they are better.

The Brown poll says 44.1 percent believe Obama is doing an excellent or good job, 30.3 percent rate it as "only fair" and 21.7 percent say poor.
Florida

2008 election: Obama 51 percent, McCain 48 percent
Rasmussen says 54 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 44 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 45 percent approve.
Quinnipiac says 49 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 45 percent approve, with 6 percent undecided. In October, 48 percent approved and 46 percent disapproved -- essentially a tie, given the margin of error. Back in June, 58 percent approved of Obama's performance and 35 percent disapproved.
Georgia
2008 election: McCain 52 percent, Obama 47 percent
Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 51 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 42 percent approve.
Idaho
2008 election: McCain 61 percent, Obama 36 percent
Smith says 54 percent view Obama unfavorably while 35 percent see him favorably, with 10 percent undecided. Last June, 47 percent saw him unfavorably and 46 percent favorably, with 7 percent undecided.
Illinois
2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 37 percent

Research 2000 says 60 percent view Obama favorably while 36 percent regard him unfavorably, with 4 percent undecided. Independents regard him favorably by 61 percent to 35 percent.

Rasmussen says 54 percent approve of Obama's performance while 45 percent disapprove. Forty-two percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 33 percent rate them about the same and 20 percent say they are better.
Indiana
Daily Kos/Research 2000, Feb. 8-10; Rasmussen Reports, Jan. 21 & 24
2008 election: Obama 49.8 percent, McCain 48.8 percent
Research 2000 says 49 percent see Obama unfavorably and 46 percent regard him favorably, with 5 percent undecided. Independents see him unfavorably by a 49 percent to 44 percent margin.
Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 43 percent approve. Sixty percent oppose the health care plan advocated by Obama and congressional Democrats (with 48 percent "strongly" opposing) while 37 percent favor it. Forty-three percent say economic conditions are getting worse 27 percent believe they are improving and 24 percent say they are about the same.

Iowa

Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 18; KCCI/Research 2000, Feb. 15-17

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Rasmussen says 54 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 45 percent approve.

Research 2000 says 52 percent see Obama favorably while 41 percent do not, with 7 percent undecided. Independents see him unfavorably by 55 percent to 39 percent with 6 percent undecided. Forty-nine percent approve of the job he is doing as president while 46 percent do not, with 5 percent undecided. Independents disapprove of his job performance by 48 percent to 47 percent with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-seven percent disapprove of the health care reform plan now in the Senate while 36 percent approve, with 7 percent undecided. Thirty-six percent say their families are worse off than a year ago, 36 percent say they are about the same and 28 percent say they are better off.
Kansas

SurveyUSA, Feb. 12-14
2008 election: McCain 56 percent, Obama 41 percent

SurveyUSA says 62 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 35 percent approve, with 3 percent undecided. Independents (23 percent of the sample) disapprove by 62 percent to 33 percent, with 5 percent undecided
Kentucky
Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 2

2008 election: McCain 57 percent, Obama 41 percent
Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 42 percent approve. Forty-two percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 35 percent say they are about the same and 20 percent say they are getting better.
Maine
2008 election: Obama 58 percent, McCain 40 percent
Daily Kos/Research 2000 says 67 percent of voters view Obama favorably compared to 25 percent who see him unfavorably with 8 percent undecided. Independents see him favorably by 73 percent to 18 percent.
Public Policy Polling says voters approve of Obama's job performance by 49 percent to 41 percent with 10 percent undecided. They are split on his health care reform proposal with 41 percent favoring it, 40 percent opposed and 19 percent undecided.
Maryland
2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 36 percent
Rasmussen says 59 percent approve of Obama's performance while 40 percent disapprove.

Gonzales says 56 percent of voters approve of Obama's job performance while 30 percent disapprove, with 14 percent undecided. That's a slight drop since September.
Massachusetts
2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 36 percent
PPP says 44 percent approved of Obama's job performance, 43 percent disapproved and 13 percent were undecided. Forty-eight percent opposed his health care plan, 40 percent supported it and 12 percent were undecided. Seventy-one percent of Democrats approved of Obama's performance, a relatively low figure for such a Democratic stronghold. Independents disapproved of Obama by a 52 to 33 percent margin.
Rasmussen says that 57 percent of voters approve of the job Obama is doing while 41 percent do not. Fifty-two percent back the health care reform plan being pushed by Obama and congressional Democrats while 46 percent oppose it. Sixty-five percent say the would-be bomber who tried to set off explosives on a U.S. airliner Christmas Day should be tried by a military tribunal and not in a civilian criminal court as the Obama administration has decided.
Michigan
2008 election results: Obama 57 percent, McCain 41 percent
Rasmussen says 50 percent of voters disapprove of Obama's performance compared to 48 percent who approve. Forty-eight percent oppose the health care reform proposal he and congressional Democrats are pushing while 47 percent favor it, with 5 percent undecided. Thirty-six percent oppose Obama's strategy for Afghanistan, 32 percent support it with 31 percent undecided. On its specific components, 50 percent back sending more troops to Afghanistan while 34 percent are against doing so, with 16 percent undecided. Forty-four percent support Obama's decision to set a timetable to begin withdrawal in 2011, 42 percent oppose it and 14 percent are undecided.
Minnesota

St. Cloud State University, Oct. 26 - Nov. 4

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Fifty percent say Obama is doing an excellent or good job, 22 percent rate him only as fair, and 25 percent as poor.

Missouri
2008 election: McCain 49.3 percent, Obama 49.2 percent
Rasmussen finds that 59 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 40 percent approve. Forty-nine percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 34 percent say they are about the same and 14 percent say they are improving.
Nebraska
2008 election: McCain 57 percent, Obama 42 percent
Rasmussen says 61 percent of Nebraskans disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 38 percent approve. Of those, 47 percent are in the "strongly" disapprove category. Sixty-four percent propose the health care overhaul advocated by Obama and congressional Democrats (with 53 percent of those opposing it "strongly") while 35 percent back it. Forty-two percent say Democratic Sen. Ben Nelson, who provided the crucial vote in the Senate on the health care reform bill, is too supportive of Obama's agenda. Thirty percent say his support of Obama is about right and 13 percent consider him too opposed.
Nevada
2008 election: Obama 55 percent, McCain 43 percent

Mason-Dixon says 46 percent have an unfavorable view of Obama while 39 percent see him positively, with 15 percent declaring themselves neutral.
Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 43 percent approve.
Research 2000 says 50 percent see Obama unfavorably while 45 percent regard him favorably. Independents (17 percent of the sample) see him unfavorably by a 54 percent to 43 percent margin.
PPP says 52 percent of voters disapprove of Obama's performance while 44 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent oppose the health reform plan Obama is backing while 36 percent support it, with 10 percent undecided.
New Hampshire
2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent
Rasmussen says 51 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 41 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 49 percent approve. Forty-two percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 33 percent rate them about the same and 22 percent say they are getting better.
Research 2000 says 55 percent see Obama favorably while 38 percent regard him unfavorably, with 7 percent undecided.
New Jersey
Fairleigh Dickinson University, Oct. 22 - Nov. 1; Public Policy Polling, Oct. 31 - Nov. 1; Rasmussen Reports, Oct. 29; Quinnipiac, Oct. 20-26
2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 41 percent
Fifty-three percent approve of the job Obama is doing compared to 37 percent who don't with 10 percent undecided, according to Fairleigh Dickinson.
Public Policy Polling has voters divided at 45 percent each on whether or not they approve of Obama's performance with 10 percent undecided.
Rasmussen says 55 percent approve of Obama's performance and 44 percent disapprove with 1 percent undecided.
Quinnipiac says voters approve of the job Obama is doing by 55 percent to 39 percent with 6 percent undecided. The New York Times says Obama is viewed favorably by 62 percent and unfavorably by 25 percent with 12 percent not expressing an opinion.
New Mexico

Public Policy Polling, Feb. 18-20

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 42 percent

PPP says 48 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 45 percent approve, with 7 percent undecided. Independents (15 percent of the sample) disapprove of Obama's performance by a 64 percent to 27 percent margin, with 9 percent undecided. Forty-nine percent opposed his health care reform plan (although this poll was taken before the latest version was released) while 40 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided. Independents oppose his health care plan by 62 percent to 28 percent, with 11 percent undecided.

New York

Siena Research Institute, Feb. 14-19; Quinnipiac University, Jan. 27- Feb.1; Rasmussen Reports, Jan. 18; Marist Institute, Jan. 13-14

2008 election: Obama 63 percent, McCain 36 percent

Siena says 61 percent view Obama favorably while 35 percent see him unfavorably. Independents see him favorably by a 57 percent to 40 percent margin.

Quinnipiac says 57 percent approve of the way Obama is doing his job and 38 percent disapprove, with 5 percent undecided. It's a slight drop from December, but it represents a steady decline since February when his approval rating stood at 72 percent. His margin of approval rating among independents was lower at 51 percent to 43 percent.

Rasmussen says 56 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 43 percent disapprove.

Marist says 56 percent believe Obama is doing a good or excellent job, 22 percent grade it as fair and 21 percent as poor.

North Carolina

Elon University, Feb. 22-25; Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 23; Public Policy Polling, Feb. 12-15


2008 election: Obama 49.7 percent, McCain 49.4 percent

Elon University says 50.3 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 44,6 percent disapprove.

Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 43 percent approve. Forty-four percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 36 percent rate them about the same and 18 percent say they have improved.

PPP says 51 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 45 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided, matching his highest disapproval rating in the state since he took office. Independents (18 percent of the sample) disapprove by a 53 percent to 40 percent margin, with 6 percent undecided. Fifty-three percent oppose the health care plan he has advocated while 38 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided.
North Dakota
2008 election results: McCain 53 percent, Obama 44 percent
Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of the way Obama is doing his job (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving while 39 percent approve. Forty-four percent say their personal finances have not changed for the better or worse, 38 percent say they have become worse and 15 percent say better.
Research 2000 says Obama is seen unfavorably by 54 percent and favorably by 41 percent, with 5 percent undecided. Independents (32 percent of the sample) see him unfavorably by a 59 percent to 37 percent margin.
Ohio
2008 election: Obama 51 percent, McCain 47 percent
Quinnipiac says 52 percent disapprove of the way Obama is handling his job while 44 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. This is the highest level of disapproval in the state since Obama took office. Independents disapprove by 57 percent to 38 percent, with 5 percent undecided. Last September, 53 percent approved and 42 percent disapproved. Fifty-seven percent disapprove of Obama's handling of the economy while 39 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. The percentage of those who disapprove is up 4 points since November. Independents disapprove of his handling of the economy by 64 percent to 33 percent, with 4 percent undecided.

Rasmussen says 54 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 46 percent approve. Fifty-six percent oppose the health care overhaul and Obama and congressional Democrats are pushing while 39 percent support it. Of those against it, 49 percent say they are "strongly" opposed. Forty percent rate Obama's handling of Afghanistan as good or excellent, 26 percent as fair and 32 percent as poor.
Oklahoma
Tulsa World, Jan. 2-5
2008 election: McCain 66 percent, Obama 34 percent
The Tulsa World poll says 58 percent of voters disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 36 percent approve and 6 percent are undecided.
Oregon

Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 17; SurveyUSA, Feb. 12-14
2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 40 percent

Rasmussen says 53 percent approve of Obama's job performance while 47 percent disapprove.

SurveyUSA says 53 percent approve of Obama's performance while 43 percent disapprove, with 4 percent undecided.
South Carolina
2008 election: McCain 54 percent, Obama 45 percent
PPP says 49 percent disapprove of Obama's job performance while 46 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided.

Pennsylvania

Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 10; Franklin & Marshall College, Jan. 18-24
2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent
Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 43 percent approve. Seventy-one percent say they are angry at the federal government (with 46 percent describing themselves as "very" angry) while 24 percent are not very angry or not angry at all.
F & M says voters split at 44 percent each on whether they see Obama favorably or not, with 10 percent undecided and 2 percent saying they don't know. The biggest segment, at 33 percent, are those who regard Obama very unfavorably. In October, 45 percent said they saw Obama favorably, 39 percent saw him unfavorably and 13 percent were undecided.
South Dakota

Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 23

2008 election: McCain 53 percent, Obama 45 percent

Rasmussen says that 59 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving while 40 percent approve.

Texas
Daily Kos/Research 2000, Feb. 8-10; Public Policy Polling, Feb. 4-7; Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 1

2008 election: McCain 55 percent, Obama 44 percent

Research 2000 says 54 percent view Obama unfavorably while 44 percent see him favorably. Independents see him unfavorably by 53 percent to 44 percent.
PPP says 61 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 33 percent approve, with 7 percent undecided. Fifty-nine percent oppose Obama's health care plan, in its current form, while 27 percent support it, with 14 percent undecided. Independents (24 percent of the sample) disapprove of Obama by 70 percent to 19 percent, with 11 percent undecided.
Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 48 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve.
Utah

2008 election: McCain 62 percent, Obama 34 percent
Sixty percent disapprove of Obama's job performance while 38 percent approve.
Virginia
2008 election: Obama 53 percent, McCain 46 percent
SurveyUSA, Dec. 11-13; Public Policy Polling, Oct. 31- Nov.1;
SurveyUSA says 54 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 44 percent approve, with 2 percent undecided. Sixty-eight percent of whites (72 percent of the sample) disapprove while 88 percent of blacks (18 percent of the sample) approve. Independents disapprove by a 63 percent to 35 percent margin. Last month, 60 percent disapproved and 37 percent approved.
Public Policy Polling says Virginians disapprove of Obama's performance by 52 percent to 41 percent with 6 percent undecided.

Washington State

SurveyUSA,
Feb. 12-14; Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 11

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 40 percent

Rasmussen says 51 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 48 percent disapprove (with 40 percent "strongly" disapproving). Forty-five percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 33 percent say they are about the same and 18 percent say they are improving.

SurveyUSA says 49 percent approve of Obama's performance while 47 percent disapprove, with 3 percent undecided. Independents (35 percent of the sample) disapprove by 61 percent to 34 percent, with 4 percent undecided.

Wisconsin

2008 election: Obama 56 percent, McCain 42 percent
Rasmussen says 52 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 47 percent approve.

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