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Latest Round-Up of Obama Poll Ratings by State

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The latest round-up of President Obama's job approval or favorability ratings by state updates or adds Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wisconsin.


Alabama


Public Policy Polling, March 27-29

2008 election: McCain 60 percent, Obama 38 percent

PPP says 55 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 42 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. Voters oppose Obama's health care reform plan by 56 percent to 39 percent with 5 percent undecided, and they favor an effort to repeal the legislation by 54 percent to 40 percent, with 6 percent undecided.
Alaska
2008 election: McCain 59 percent, Obama 38 percent
PPP says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 37 percent approve, with 8 percent undecided.
Arizona

Rasmussen Reports, April 15; Daily Kos/Research 2000, March 29-31

2008 election: McCain 53 percent, Obama 45 percent

Rasmussen says 64 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 55 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 34 percent approve.

Research 2000 says Obama is seen unfavorably by 55 percent and favorably by 41 percent, with 4 percent undecided. Forty-four percent said they would be more likely to vote for a candidate who would repeal the health care overhaul compared to 39 percent who favor a candidate that supports the measure. Seventeen percent were undecided.
Arkansas
2008 election: McCain 59 percent, Obama 39 percent

Research 2000 says Obama is seen unfavorably by 60 percent while 38 percent see him favorably, with 2 percent undecided. Forty-seven percent said they'd be more likely to vote for a candidate who wants to repeal the new health care reform law completely while 38 percent would be more likely to back a candidate who supports the law and would work to improve it. Fifteen percent were undecided

Rasmussen says 61 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 52 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 37 percent approve. Sixty percent believe the health legislation passed by Congress will be bad for the country, 28 percent say it will be good, 3 percent predict no impact and 9 percent are undecided. Sixty-three percent favor repealing the overhaul plan (with 55 percent "strongly" favoring it) while 33 percent are against doing so, with 4 percent undecided.

California
Rasmussen Reports, April 12; Los Angeles Times/USC, March 23-30

2008 election: Obama 61 percent, McCain 37 percent
Rasmussen says 57 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 41 percent disapprove. Fifty percent believe the health care reform plan he signed into law will be good for the country while 41 percent say it will be bad, with 1 percent predicting no impact and 9 percent undecided. But 51 percent say they favor repealing the law while 44 percent oppose it, with 4 percent undecided.

The L.A. Times says its poll of Californians shows the state cutting against the grain on its view of the health care reform legislation, compared to the rest of the country. Fifty-two percent said the country will be better off due to its passage, compared with 36 percent who said it would do worse, with 12 percent undecided. However, 47 percent said they didn't believe they and their own families would see benefits from the overhaul, while 41 percent did see improvement, with 13 percent undecided. Forty-six percent said they'd be more likely to vote for a politician who supported the legislation while 29 percent would not.

Colorado
2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 45 percent

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 52 percent "strongly" disapproving while 44 percent approve.
PPP says 50 percent approve of Obama's performance, while 47 percent do not, with 3 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by a margin of 54 percent to 43 percent, with 3 percent undecided. Fifty-one percent oppose his health care plan, while 40 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided.

Connecticut
2008 election: Obama 60 percent, McCain 38 percent
Rasmussen says 55 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 44 percent do not. Forty-six percent say the health care plan he signed into law will be good for the country while 44 percent do not, with 3 percent predicting it will have no impact and 7percent undecided. Fifty-two percent favor repealing the law (with 41 percent "strongly" in favor of that) while 45 percent oppose such a move.

Quinnipiac says 54 percent approve of the job Obama is doing, while 42 percent disapprove, with 4 percent undecided. But 50 percent disapprove of his handling of the economy, while 46 percent approve, a turnaround from November when 42 percent approved and 43 percent disapproved. Fifty-two percent disapprove of his handling of health care, while 42 percent approve, compared with 48 percent to 45 percent in November. Fifty-one percent trust Obama more to handle health care, while 31 percent trust Republicans in Congress more, with 18 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent approve of his handling of foreign policy, while 39 percent don't, with 7 percent undecided. Fifty-one percent say he has been a better president than George W. Bush, 23 percent rate him about the same, and 23 percent say he is worse.
Delaware

Daily Kos/Research 2000, Feb. 22-24; Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 22; Brown University, Feb. 9-12

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 37 percent
Research 2000 says 59 percent view Obama favorably and 36 percent unfavorably, with 5 percent undecided.

Rasmussen says 51 percent approve of Obama's performance, while 48 percent disapprove. Fifty-one percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 28 percent say they are about the same, and 18 percent say they are better.

The Brown poll says 44.1 percent believe Obama is doing an excellent or good job, 30.3 percent rate it as "only fair" and 21.7 percent say poor.
Florida

Rasmussen Reports, April 21; Mason-Dixon Research & Polling, March 23-25; Daily Kos/Research 2000, March 15-17

2008 election: Obama 51 percent, McCain 48 percent

Rasmussen says 54 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 46 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 44
percent approve.

Mason-Dixon says 52 percent see Obama unfavorably, compared with 37 percent who see him favorably. Fifty-four percent of voters oppose the health care package Obama signed into law, while 34 percent supported it. Sixty-five percent of voters over 65, an important bloc in the state, opposed the reform plan.

Research 2000 says 49 percent view Obama unfavorably, while 47 percent see him favorably, with 4 percent undecided. Independents see him unfavorably by 51 percent to 43 percent, with 6 percent undecided..

Georgia

Rasmussen Reports, April 22; Daily Kos/Research 2000, April 5-7

2008 election: McCain 52 percent, Obama 47 percent

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 51 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve. Fifty-six percent say the health care reform plan he signed into law will be bad for the country, 33 percent say it will be good, 4 percent predict it will have no impact and 7 percent are undecided. Sixty percent would back efforts to repeal the law (with 55 percent "strongly" in favor of doing so) while 35 percent oppose such an effort.

Research 2000 says 51 percent see Obama unfavorably, while 45 percent see him favorably, with 4 percent undecided.

Hawaii

Rasmussen Reports, March 24

2008 election: Obama 72 percent, McCain 28 percent

Rasmussen says 77 percent approve of the job Obama is doing, while 23 percent disapprove.
Idaho
2008 election: McCain 61 percent, Obama 36 percent
Rasmussen says that 70 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 61 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 30 percent approve. Seventy percent oppose the health care plan Obama backed in Congress (with 65 percent "strongly" opposed), while 28 percent favored it. Sixty-seven percent say Obama has done a poor job of handling health care, 6 percent rate it fair, and 26 percent say it is excellent or good.

Illinois
Rasmussen Reports, April 5; Public Policy Polling, April 1-5

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 37 percent

Rasmussen says 58 percent approve of Obama's performance, while 41 percent do not.

PPP says 50 percent approve of Obama's performance, while 42 percent disapprove, with 8 percent undecided. Forty-six percent back the health care plan he signed into law, while 43 percent oppose it, with 11 percent undecided. (The margin of error is 4 points). Forty-seven percent oppose any efforts to repeal the law, while 42 percent support them, with 10 percent undecided.

Indiana
Rasmussen Reports, April 13-14
2008 election: Obama 49.8 percent, McCain 48.8 percent
Rasmussen says 60 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 47 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 39 percent approve. Fifty-eight percent believe the health care reform plan he signed into law will be bad for the country while
28 percent say it will be good and 12 percent are undecided. Sixty-five percent support an effort to repeal the law (with 56 percent "strongly" favoring such a move) while 29 percent oppose it, with 6 percent undecided.
Iowa

Rasmussen Reports, March 17

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Rasmussen says 50 percent approve of Obama's job performance, while 49 percent disapprove. Fifty-three percent oppose the health care plan that he and Democrats in Congress backed (with 43 percent in "strong" opposition), while 45 percent support it. Forty-six percent thought Obama has done a poor job handling the issues, 17 percent call it fair, and 38 percent say excellent or good.

Kansas

SurveyUSA, March 12-14; Rasmussen Reports, Feb. 24
2008 election: McCain 56 percent, Obama 41 percent

SurveyUSA says 61 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing, while 37 percent approve, and 2 percent are undecided. Independents disapprove by 56 percent to 42 percent.

Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 42 percent approve.

Kentucky

Rasmussen Reports, March 31; Daily Kos/Research 2000, March 15-17

2008 election: McCain 57 percent, Obama 41 percent

Rasmussen says 62 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 53 percent strongly disapproving), while 38 percent approve. The same percentage says the health care overhaul signed into law by Obama will have a bad impact on the country. Sixty-five percent favor repealing it (with 53 percent "strongly" in favor), while 31 percent oppose such an effort

Research 2000 says 57 percent see Obama unfavorably, while 39 percent see him favorably, with 4 percent undecided. Independents see him unfavorably by 61 percent to 35 percent.

Louisiana

Rasmussen Reports, April 7

2008 elections: McCain 59 percent, Obama 40 percent

Rasmussen says 62 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 53 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 40 percent approve. Fifty-eight percent say the health care overhaul he signed into law will be bad for the country, 35 percent say it will be good, 3 percent predict it will have no impact and 4 percent are undecided. Sixty-seven percent favor efforts to repeal the law (with 57 percent "strongly" in favor) while 30 percent oppose such a move, with 3 percent undecided.

Maine
2008 election: Obama 58 percent, McCain 40 percent
Daily Kos/Research 2000 says 67 percent of voters view Obama favorably, compared with 25 percent who see him unfavorably, with 8 percent undecided. Independents see him favorably by 73 percent to 18 percent.
Public Policy Polling says voters approve of Obama's job performance by 49 percent to 41 percent, with 10 percent undecided. They split on his health care reform proposal with 41 percent favoring it, 40 percent opposed and 19 percent undecided.
Maryland
Rasmussen Reports, April 20

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 36 percent
Rasmussen says 59 percent approve of Obama's performance, while 41 percent disapprove. Fifty percent say the health care measure Obama signed into law will be good for the country while 40 percent say it will be bad, with 2 percent predicting no impact and 7 percent undecided. Forty-nine percent oppose efforts to repeal the law while 46 percent favor them.

Massachusetts
2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 36 percent

Rasmussen says 56 percent approve of the job Obama is doing, while 44 percent disapprove. Forty-six percent believe the health care reform package that just became law will be good for the country, while 44 percent say it will be bad, with 3 percent predicting no impact and 7 percent undecided. Voters are divided at 48 percent each on whether they support or oppose efforts to repeal the legislation. (The poll's margin of error is 4.5 points).
PPP says 44 percent approved of Obama's job performance, 43 percent disapproved and 13 percent were undecided. Forty-eight percent opposed his health care plan, 40 percent supported it, and 12 percent were undecided. Seventy-one percent of Democrats approved of Obama's performance, a relatively low figure for such a Democratic stronghold. Independents disapproved of Obama by 52 percent to 33 percent.
Michigan
EPIC/MRA, March 28-31;
2008 election results: Obama 57 percent, McCain 41 percent
EPIC/MRA says 50 percent view Obama favorably and 40 percent unfavorably. But 55 percent give him negative marks for the job he is doing, while 44 percent give him positive marks. Forty-eight percent say it is a bad thing the health care overhaul was approved, and 45 percent consider it a good thing, with 7 percent undecided.

Minnesota

St. Cloud State University, Oct. 26 - Nov. 4

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Fifty percent say Obama is doing an excellent or good job, 22 percent rate him only as fair, and 25 percent as poor.

Missouri
2008 election: McCain 49.3 percent, Obama 49.2 percent

Rasmussen says 59 percent disapprove of Obama's job performance (with 46 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 40 percent approve. Fifty-six percent say that the health care reform package that just became law will be bad for the country, while 32 percent say it will be good, with 2 percent predicting no impact and 10 percent undecided. Fifty-nine percent back efforts to repeal the legislation (with 47 percent "strongly" favoring them), while 36 percent oppose such a move, with 4 percent undecided.

PPP says 52 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 43 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. Independents (29 percent of the sample) disapprove by 59 percent to 37 percent, with 4 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent oppose the health care reform plan backed by Obama, while 37 percent supported it, with 9 percent undecided. Fifty-one percent want Republicans to try to repeal the legislation, while 42 percent do not, with 8 percent undecided.

Nebraska
Rasmussen Reports, March 4

2008 election: McCain 57 percent, Obama 42 percent
Rasmussen says 61 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 47 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 38 percent approve. Sixty-four percent oppose the health care plan advocated by Obama and Democratic leaders in Congress (with 51 percent in strong opposition), while 32 percent favor it. Fifty-five percent rate Obama's handling of the health care issue as poor, 16 percent call it fair, and 28 percent say it is good or excellent.
Nevada
2008 election: Obama 55 percent, McCain 43 percent

Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 42
percent approve. Forty-one percent believe that a year from now, the economy will be weaker than it is, 37 percent predict it will be stronger, 15 percent say it will be about the same, and 7 percent are undecided.
New Hampshire
2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

PPP says 48 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 47 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by a margin of 51 percent to 43 percent, with 6 percent undecided. Fifty percent oppose the health care reform plan he signed into law while 42 percent support it, with 8 percent undecided.

Rasmussen says 50 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 43 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 49 percent approve. Fifty-three percent say the health care plan he signed into law will be bad for the country, 38 percent say it will be good, 2 percent said it will have no impact and 7 percent are undecided. Fifty-eight percent favor an effort to repeal the law (with 47 percent "strongly" favoring it), while 38 percent oppose such a move.

New Jersey

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Oct. 22 - Nov. 1; Public Policy Polling, Oct. 31 - Nov. 1; Rasmussen Reports, Oct. 29; Quinnipiac, Oct. 20-26
2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 41 percent
Fifty-three percent approve of the job Obama is doing, compared with 37 percent who don't, with 10 percent undecided, according to Fairleigh Dickinson.
Public Policy Polling has voters divided at 45 percent each on whether or not they approve of Obama's performance, with 10 percent undecided.
Rasmussen says 55 percent approve of Obama's performance and 44 percent disapprove, with 1 percent undecided.
Quinnipiac says voters approve of the job Obama is doing by 55 percent to 39 percent, with 6 percent undecided. The New York Times says Obama is viewed favorably by 62 percent and unfavorably by 25 percent, with 12 percent not expressing an opinion.
New Mexico

Rasmussen Reports, March 24

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 42 percent

Rasmussen says 54 percent approve of the job Obama is doing, while 46 percent disapprove. Those who "strongly" approve of his performance are evenly matched with those who "strongly" disapprove, 37 percent and 38 percent, respectively. Fifty-three percent favor the health care plan that Obama backed, while 44 percent oppose it. Forty-six percent said Obama had done a good or excellent job handling the issue, 11 percent rated it fair, and 44 percent said it was poor.

New York

Siena Research Institute, April 12-15; Quinnipiac University, April 6-11; Marist Institute, March 23-24

2008 election: Obama 63 percent, McCain 36 percent

Siena says 59 percent view Obama favorably while 35 percent see him unfavorably, with 6 percent undecided.

Quinnipiac says 62 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 33 percent disapprove, with 5 percent undecided.

Marist says 53 percent say Obama is doing an excellent or good job, 21 percent rate it fair, and 26 percent call it poor.

North Carolina

Elon University, April 19-22; Rasmussen Reports, April 19; Civitas Institute, April 13-15

2008 election: Obama 49.7 percent, McCain 49.4 percent

Elon says 48 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 46.7 percent approve, with 4.7 percent undecided. Forty-six percent have an unfavorable opinion of Obama while 45.4 percent see him unfavorably, with 8.4 percent undecided. Nearly 32 percent say Obama has done the best job of dealing with the main issues faced by the country
compared to 30.6 percent who say the best job has been done by congressional Republicans and 12.2 percent cite the
congressional Democrats. Twenty percent say none of them.

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 43 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve. Fifty-nine percent say the health care plan he signed into law will be bad for the country, 33 percent say it
will be good and 6 percent are undecided. Sixty-one percent favor repealing it (with 48 percent "strongly" favoring
such a move) while 32 percent oppose doing so, with 6 percent undecided.

Civitas says 45 percent see Obama unfavorably while 44 percent see him favorably, with 12 percent undecided.

North Dakota
2008 election results: McCain 53 percent, Obama 44 percent
Rasmussen says 55 percent disapprove of the way Obama is doing his job (with 42 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 44 percent approve. Fifty-eight percent oppose the health care reform plan advocated by Obama (with 48 percent in "strong" opposition), while 36 percent favor it. Fifty-three percent say Obama has done a poor job of handling the issue, 14 percent rate it fair and 32 percent call it good or excellent.
Research 2000 says Obama is seen unfavorably by 54 percent and favorably by 41 percent, with 5 percent undecided. Independents (32 percent of the sample) see him unfavorably by 59 percent to 37 percent.
Ohio

Daily Kos/ Research 2000, April 5-7; Rasmussen Reports, March 30; Quinnipiac University, March 23-29; Public Policy Polling, March 20-21;

2008 election: Obama 51 percent, McCain 47 percent

Research 2000 says 46 percent view Obama favorably, while 45 percent see him unfavorably, with 9 percent undecided.

Rasmussen says 53 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 44 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 46 percent approve. Fifty-two percent say that the health care plan Obama signed into law will be bad for the country, while 41 percent say it will be good, with 1 percent predicting no impact and 7 percent undecided. Fifty-five percent favor repealing the measure (with 48 percent "strongly" favoring such a move), while 40 percent oppose doing so, with 4 percent undecided.

Quinnipiac says Obama's job approval rating has recovered somewhat over a February low. Forty-eight percent now disapprove of the job he is doing, while 47 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. In February, 52 percent disapproved and 44 percent approved. Independents disapprove by 54 percent to 40 percent, with 6 percent undecided. Voters disapprove of Obama's handling of the economy by 54 percent to 40 percent, with 6 percent undecided. They disapprove of his handling of health care by 51 percent to 41 percent, with 8 percent undecided. They trust Obama more than Republicans in Congress on health care by 45 percent to 39 percent, with 16 percent undecided. Voters say by 45 percent to 32 percent that Obama has been a better president than George W. Bush, with 20 percent rating them both about the same. Forty-six percent say they want the senator elected from Ohio this year to oppose Obama's policies, while 44 percent want that senator to support them, with 10 percent undecided. (The margin of error is 2.5 points).

PPP says 53 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing, while 40 percent approve, and 7 percent are undecided. Independents disapprove by 63 percent to 32 percent, with 6 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent oppose his health care plan while 39 percent support it, with 6 percent undecided. PPP's Dean Debnam, commenting on the Ohio Senate race, observed: "None of the candidates in Ohio is really standing out right now. But if Barack Obama's numbers in the state remain this low it's not likely to elect a Democratic senator this year. His popularity could be the deciding factor in this race."

SurveyUSA says 52 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing, while 42 percent approve, with 6 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by 66 percent to 31 percent, with 3 percent undecided.
Oklahoma

2008 election: McCain 66 percent, Obama 34 percent
Rasmussen says 62 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 38 percent approve. Forty-eight percent say their personal finances are getting worse, 29 percent say they are about the same and 21 percent say they are better.

Oregon

SurveyUSA, March 12-14
2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 40 percent

SurveyUSA says 50 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing, while 48 percent approve, and 2 percent are undecided. The margin of error is 4.1 points. Independents disapprove by 55 percent to 43 percent.

Pennsylvania

www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections2/election_2010/election_2010_governor_elections/pennsylvania/toplines/toplines_pennsylvania_governor_april_15_2010Rasmussen Reports, April 15; Susquehanna Polling & Research, April 7-12; Muhlenberg College, March 29 - April 7; Quinnipiac University, March 30 - April 5; Public Policy Polling, March 29 - April 1

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Rasmussen says 52 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 41 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 48
percent approve.

Susquehanna says 49 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 42 percent approve, with 9 percent undecided. Forty-seven percent oppose the new health care reform plan while 43 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided.

Muhlenberg says 43 percent disapprove of the way Obama has handled the economy while 40 percent approve, with 6 percent undecided. Fifty-two percent say the health care reform package is a bad thing while 36 percent say it is a good thing, 2 percent say it is neither good or bad and 10 percent are undecided. Thirty-two percent are disappointed about passage of the measure, 26 percent are angry, 24 percent are pleased and 12 percent are enthusiastic, with 5 percent undecided.

Quinnipiac says 49 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing, while 45 percent approve, with 6 percent undecided. That's a turnaround from last month when voters approved of his performance by 49 percent to 46 percent, with 4 percent undecided. Fifty-five percent disapprove of Obama's handling of the economy, while 40 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-five percent also disapprove of his handling of health care, while 37 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-three percent oppose the health care reform measure that Obama signed into law, while 39 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided. Voters split on who they trust more to handle the health care issue, with 40 percent choosing Obama and 38 percent choosing Republicans in Congress, with 22 percent undecided. Sixty-eight percent said that Obama's support for Sen. Arlen Specter's re-election bid makes no difference in their decision on how to vote, 22 percent said Obama's support made it less likely they'd back Specter, and only 9 percent said it made it more likely.

PPP says 50 percent of voters disapprove of the job Obama is doing, while 46 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. They oppose his health care reform plan by 49 percent to 44 percent, with 7 percent undecided. Fifty percent would support a Republican push to repeal the legislation, while 46 percent would not, with 4 percent undecided. PPP's Dean Debnam says Obama's depressed approval numbers could have consequences for the re-election bid by Specter.

Rhode Island


Rasmussen Reports , March. 25

2008 election: Obama 63 percent, McCain 35 percent

Rasmussen says 61 percent approve of Obama's performance (with 42 percent "strongly" approving), while 39 percent
disapprove. Fifty-seven percent back Obama on the health care overhaul, while 41 percent do not. Fifty percent would vote against a congressional candidate who wants to repeal the health care legislation, while 42 percent would support that candidate.

South Carolina

2008 election: McCain 54 percent, Obama 45 percent
PPP says 49 percent disapprove of Obama's job performance, while 46 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided.

South Dakota
Rasmussen Reports, March 25

2008 election: McCain 53 percent, Obama 45 percent

Rasmussen says 55 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 39 percent disapprove.

Tennessee

Rasmussen Reports, March 22

2008 elections: McCain 57 percent, Obama 42 percent

Rasmussen says 62 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 52 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 36 percent approve.

Texas
Rasmussen Reports, April 14

2008 election: McCain 55 percent, Obama 44 percent

Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 52 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 42 percent approve. Sixty-seven percent support a move to repeal the legislation (with 58 percent "strongly" in favor of doing
that) while 28 percent oppose the idea.

Utah
Deseret News/KSL-TV, Nov. 19-23

2008 election: McCain 62 percent, Obama 34 percent
Sixty percent disapprove of Obama's job performance, while 38 percent approve.

Vermont

Rasmussen Reports, March 18

2008 elections: Obama 67 percent, McCain 30 percent

Rasmussen says 62 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 52 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 36 percent approve.

Virginia
2008 election: Obama 53 percent, McCain 46 percent
SurveyUSA, Dec. 11-13; Public Policy Polling, Oct. 31- Nov.1;
SurveyUSA says 54 percent disapprove of Obama's performance, while 44 percent approve, with 2 percent undecided. Sixty-eight percent of whites (72 percent of the sample) disapprove, while 88 percent of blacks (18 percent of the sample) approve. Independents disapprove by a 63 percent to 35 percent margin. Last month, 60 percent disapproved and 37 percent approved.
Public Policy Polling says Virginians disapprove of Obama's performance by 52 percent to 41 percent, with 6 percent undecided.

Washington State

Rasmussen Reports
, April 6; Daily Kos/Research 2000, March 22-24; SurveyUSA, March 12-14

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 40 percent

Rasmussen says 54 percent approve of the job Obama is doing, while 43 percent disapprove. Washington voters split evenly at 45 percent on whether the health care measure signed into law by Obama will be good or bad for the country. Fifty percent oppose an effort to repeal it, while 48 percent support such a move.

Research 2000 says 55 percent view Obama favorably, while 40 percent see him unfavorably, with 5 percent undecided. Independents see him favorably by 56 percent to 38 percent, with 6 percent undecided.

SurveyUSA says 49 percent disapprove of Obama's performance, while 46 percent approve and 5 percent are undecided. The margin of error is 4.1 points. Independents disapprove by a 56 percent to 35 percent margin, with 9 percent undecided.

Wisconsin

Rasmussen Reports
, April 20; Daily Kos/Research 2000, March 22-24; Public Policy Polling, March 20-21; Wisconsin Policy Research Institute, March 7-9

2008 election: Obama 56 percent, McCain 42 percent


Rasmussen says that 52 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 40 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 48
percent approve. Fifty percent rate the economy as poor, 43 percent as fair, 6 percent is good and none as excellent.

Research 2000 says Obama is seen favorably by 54 percent and unfavorably by 41 percent, with 5 percent undecided.

PPP says 48 percent approve of the job Obama is doing, while 46 percent do not, with 6 percent undecided. The margin of error is 3.7 points. Fifty percent oppose the health care overhaul Obama backed, while 40 percent supported it, with 10 percent undecided. Independents disapprove of Obama's performance by 53 percent to 39 percent and his health care plan by 58 percent to 34 percent.

WPRI says voters are split at 49 percent each on whether they approve or disapprove of Obama's job performance.

Wyoming

Rasmussen Reports, March 25

2008 election: McCain 65 percent, Obama 33 percent

Rasmussen says 68 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 63 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 31 percent approve. The same number oppose the health care overhaul. Sixty-eight percent believe the reform plan will be bad for the country. Sixty-nine percent favor repealing it.

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