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Latest Round-Up of Obama Poll Ratings by State

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The latest roundup of President Obama's job approval or favorability ratings by state updates Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Kansas,New Jersey, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Washington.

Recent polls have shown trouble signs for Obama in key swing states like Ohio and Pennsylvania. The latest one where his numbers have gone south is Missouri.

Alabama

Rasmussen Reports, July 22

2008 election: McCain 60 percent, Obama 38 percent

Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 44 percent approve.
Electoral Map


Arizona

Rasmussen Reports
, July 29; Behavior Research Center, June 30-July 11

2008 election: McCain 53 percent, Obama 45 percent

Rasmussen says 60 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 54 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 39 percent approve.

The BRC's Rocky Mountain Poll says that for the first time in its surveys, Obama has a net negative job approval rating with 39 percent rating it as poor and 28 percent as good. Twenty-seven percent consider it "fair" and 6 percent are undecided. BRC attributes this in part to Obama's stand on the immigration issue. (Nationally, a Quinnipiac University poll conducted July 13-19 found that voters disapproved of Obama's position on illegal immigration by 58 percent to 30 percent, with 12 percent undecided).

Arkansas
Rasmussen Reports, July 20

2008 election: McCain 59 percent, Obama 39 percent

Rasmussen says 65 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 56 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 34 percent approve. Sixty-eight percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 59 percent "strongly" in favor) while 29 percent are opposed. Sixty-nine person support enactment of an Arizona-style immigration law while 29 percent are opposed, with 11 percent undecided. Sixty-four percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to file suit against Arizona over the law while 26 percent agree, with 10 percent undecided.

California
Rasmussen Reports, Aug. 3; Public Policy Polling, July 23-25; Public Policy Institute of California, July 6-20

2008 election: Obama 61 percent, McCain 37 percent

Rasmussen says 56 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 41 percent disapprove.

PPP says 54 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 39 percent do not, with 7 percent undecided. Fifty-two percent support the new health care reform plan while 40 percent are opposed, with 9 percent undecided.

PPIC says 56 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 38 percent disapprove, with 6 percent undecided. That's 9 points lower than July 2009.

Colorado
Rasmussen Reports, Aug. 2

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 45 percent

Rasmussen says 55 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 44 percent approve.

Connecticut

Rasmussen Reports, July 15; Quinnipiac University, July 7-13

2008 election: Obama 60 percent, McCain 38 percent

Rasmussen says 54 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 45 percent do not. Fifty-one percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law while 40 percent do not, with 8 percent undecided. Fifty percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 30 percent are opposed, with 20 percent undecided.

Quinnipiac says 50 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 44 percent disapprove, with 6 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by 49 percent to 43 percent, with 8 percent undecided. This is Obama's lowest approval margin since the beginning of the year in Quinnipiac's surveys.

Delaware
Rasmussen Reports, Aug. 5

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 37 percent

Rasmussen says 55 percent approve of Obama's performance while 44 percent disapproved.
Florida

Rasmussen Reports, Aug. 2; Public Policy Polling, July 16-18

2008 election: Obama 51 percent, McCain 48 percent

Rasmussen says 50 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 44 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve. Forty-nine percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 42 percent "strongly" in favor) while 45 percent are opposed, with 7 percent undecided.

PPP says 49 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 45 percent approve, with 9 percent undecided. Independents approve by 49 percent to 43 percent with 8 percent undecided. Forty-seven percent oppose the new health care reform plan he advocated while 45 percent support it, with 8 percent undecided.

Georgia

Rasmussen Reports, July 21

2008 election: McCain 52 percent, Obama 47 percent

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve.

Hawaii

Rasmussen Reports, June 24

2008 election: Obama 72 percent, McCain 28 percent

Rasmussen says that 72 percent approve of Obama's performance (with 52 percent "strongly" approving) while 26 percent disapprove. Forty-nine percent oppose repeal of the new health care reform law while 43 percent favor it, with 8 percent undecided. Thirty-nine percent oppose enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 37 percent favor it, with 24 percent undecided.
Idaho
Rasmussen Reports, July 15

2008 election: McCain 61 percent, Obama 36 percent
Rasmussen says 68 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 61 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 32 percent approve. Sixty-seven percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 59 percent "strongly" approving) while 31 percent are opposed, with 2 percent undecided. Sixty-nine percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 24 percent are opposed, with 7 percent undecided and voters disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law by about the same margin.

Illinois
Rasmussen Reports, July 26

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 37 percent

Rasmussen says 55 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 43 percent disapprove.

Indiana
Rasmussen Reports, July 7-8

2008 election: Obama 49.8 percent, McCain 48.8 percent

Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 43 percent approve. Fifty-nine percent want to see the new health care reform law repealed (with 49 percent "strongly" in favor) while 35 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Sixty-one percent support enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 25 percent are opposed with 14 percent undecided.

Iowa

Rasmussen Reports, June 14; Public Policy Polling, May 25-27

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Rasmussen says 50 percent approve of Obama's performance while 48 percent disapprove. Forty-nine percent favor enacting an Arizona-style immigration law in Iowa while 33 percent are opposed, with 18 percent undecided.

PPP says Iowans disapprove of Obama's performance by 52 percent to 43 percent, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-two percent oppose his health care reform plan while 36 percent support it, with 11 percent undecided.

Kansas

Rasmussen Reports, Aug. 4

2008 election: McCain 56 percent, Obama 41 percent

Rasmussen says 63 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 36 percent approve. Sixty-six percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 54 percent "strongly" in favor) while 32 percent are opposed, with 3 percent undecided. Sixty-nine percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 23 percent are opposed, with 9 percent undecided. Sixty-four percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law while 28 percent agree, with 8 percent undecided.

Kentucky

Rasmussen Reports, July 20; Public Policy Polling, June 28-30

2008 election: McCain 57 percent, Obama 41 percent

Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 48 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 42 percent approve. Sixty-one percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 47 percent "strongly" in favor) while 31 percent are opposed, with 7 percent undecided. Sixty percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 21 percent are opposed, with 19 percent undecided. A similar number oppose the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law.

PPP says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 37 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Sixty percent oppose the new health care reform law he advocated while 31 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided.

Louisiana

Rasmussen Reports, June 24

2008 elections: McCain 59 percent, Obama 40 percent

Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 50 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 40 percent approve. Sixty-seven percent favor repeal of the new health care reform bill (with 58 percent "strongly" in favor) while 28 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-nine percent support enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 24 percent oppose it, with 17 percent undecided.

Maine
Rasmussen Reports, July 14

2008 election: Obama 58 percent, McCain 40 percent
Rasmussen says 50 percent approve of Obama's performance while 49 percent do not. Fifty-one percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 41 percent "strongly" in favor) while 45 percent are opposed, with 4 percent undecided. Fifty-two percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 31 percent are opposed, with 16 percent undecided. Voters disagree with the Justice Department lawsuit against Arizona over the law by about the same margin.

Maryland
Rasmussen Reports, July 8

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 36 percent

Rasmussen says 57 percent approve of Obama's performance (with 42 percent "strongly" approving) while 43 percent disapprove. Fifty-one percent favor repealing the new health care reform law (with 41 percent "strongly" in favor) while 47 percent are opposed, with 3 percent undecided. Forty-nine percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 35 percent are opposed, with 16 percent undecided.

Massachusetts
Rasmussen Reports, July 22

2008 election: Obama 62 percent, McCain 36 percent

Rasmussen says 56 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 45 percent disapprove. Forty-nine percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law while 47 percent are opposed, with 4 percent undecided. Forty-six percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 41 percent are opposed, with 13 percent undecided. Forty-seven percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law while 41 percent agree and 12 percent are undecided.
Michigan
Rasmussen Reports, June 9

2008 election results: Obama 57 percent, McCain 41 percent

Rasmussen says 51 percent disapprove of Obama's performance and 49 percent approve. Fifty-six percent favor repealing the new health care reform law (with 44 percent "strongly" in favor) while 38 percent are opposed, with 7 percent undecided. Fifty-six percent favor enacting an Arizona-like immigration law while 28 percent are opposed, with 16 percent undecided.

Minnesota

Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 26-29; Rasmussen Reports, July 19

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

The Star Tribune says Obama's job approval rating has fallen to 44 percent compared to 51 percent last September and 62 percent in April 2009. The poll said there was a significant drop in support among independents. Forty-six percent disapprove of his handling of the war in Afghanistan while 37 percent approve.

Rasmussen says 50 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 49 percent approve. Fifty-four percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 43 percent "strongly" in favor) while 40 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Sixty-two percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 27 percent are opposed, with 11 percent undecided. Fifty-five percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law, while 33 percent agree, with 12 percent undecided.

Missouri
Rasmussen Reports, July 27; St. Louis Post-Dispatch/KMOV posted July 19-21

2008 election: McCain 49.3 percent, Obama 49.2 percent

Rasmussen says 56 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 44 percent approve.

Mason-Dixon's poll for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch/KMOV says 57 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 34 percent approve, with 9 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by 63 percent to 27 percent with 10 percent undecided. Sixty-one percent oppose the new health care reform law backed by Obama while 31 percent approve, with 8 percent undecided. Sixty-one percent disapprove of his handling of the economy while 33 percent approve, with 6 percent undecided. Forty-four percent disapprove of his handling of Afghanistan while 39 percent approve, with 17 percent undecided. Seventy percent support enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 25 percent are opposed.

Nebraska
Rasmussen Reports, March 4

2008 election: McCain 57 percent, Obama 42 percent
Rasmussen says 61 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 47 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 38 percent approve. Sixty-four percent oppose the health care plan advocated by Obama and Democratic leaders in Congress (with 51 percent in strong opposition), while 32 percent favor it. Fifty-five percent rate Obama's handling of the health care issue as poor, 16 percent call it fair, and 28 percent say it is good or excellent.
Nevada

Rasmussen Reports, July 27; Public Policy Polling, July 16-18

2008 election: Obama 55 percent, McCain 43 percent

Rasmussen says 55 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 49 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 43 percent approve.

PPP says 52 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 44 percent approve, with 4 percent undecided. Independents disapprove of Obama by a 59 percent to 37 percent margin, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-two percent oppose the new health care reform plan he advocated while 42 percent support it, with 7 percent undecided.

New Hampshire

Public Policy Polling, July 23-25; Rasmussen Reports, July 12

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

PPP says 49 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 47 percent disapprove, with 4 percent undecided. Voters are split at 47 percent each on the new health care reform plan, with 7 percent undecided.

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 46 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 42 percent approve. Fifty-four percent favor repealing the new health care reform law (with 48 percent "strongly" in favor) while 44 percent are opposed. Fifty-six percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to file a lawsuit against Arizona for its new immigration law while 37 percent agree, with 8 percent undecided.
New Jersey

Fairleigh Dickinson University
, July 27-Aug.2; Monmouth University, July 7-11

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 41 percent
Fairleigh Dickinson says 49 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 40 percent do not, with 11 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by a 40 percent to 36 percent margin, with 24 percent undecided. In March's poll, 53 percent had approved of Obama's performance compared to 38 percent who did not.

Monmouth says 52 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 42 percent disapprove, with 6 percent undecided. Independents are evenly split.

New Mexico

Rasmussen Reports, June 3

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 42 percent

Rasmussen says 52 percent approve of Obama's performance while 48 percent do not. Fifty-two percent favor repealing the new health care reform law (with 40 percent "strongly" in favor) while 42 percent are opposed, with 6 percent undecided.

New York

Rasmussen Reports, July 20; Siena Research Institute, July 6-8

2008 election: Obama 63 percent, McCain 36 percent

Rasmussen says 53 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 45 percent disapprove. Fifty-six percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 41 percent "strongly" in favor) while 42 percent are opposed. Forty-seven percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 38 percent are opposed, with 16 percent undecided.

Siena says 60 percent see Obama favorably while 37 percent regard him unfavorably, with 3 percent undecided.

North Carolina

Rasmussen Reports, Aug. 3

2008 election: Obama 49.7 percent, McCain 49.4 percent

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 48 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve.

North Dakota
Rasmussen Reports, June 15-16
2008 election results: McCain 53 percent, Obama 44 percent
Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 47 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 41 percent approve. Sixty-four percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 49 percent "strongly" in favor) while 31 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided.

Ohio


Rasmussen Reports
, Aug. 2; Public Policy Polling, June 26-27; Quinnipiac University, June 22-27

2008 election: Obama 51 percent, McCain 47 percent

Rasmussen says 53 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 42 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 46 percent approve.

PPP says 54 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 42 percent approve with 4 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by a 58 percent to 33 percent margin, with 8 percent undecided. Fifty-three percent oppose the new health care reform law he advocated while 38 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided.

Quinnipiac says 49 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 45 percent approve with 6 percent undecided, about the same as in late April. Forty percent say Obama has been a better president than George W. Bush, 33 percent say he has been worse and 24 percent rate them about the same, with 3 percent undecided. Obama lost 4 points in the "better" column since late April. Voters are split on whether they will support a Senate candidate based on whether the candidate backs or opposes Obama. Forty-eight percent will vote for someone who will oppose Obama while 46 percent want a senator who will support him, with 6 percent undecided. Independents want a senator who will oppose Obama by a 50 percent to 41 percent margin, with 9 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent disapprove of Obama's handling of the economy while 41 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-five percent disapprove of the new health care reform law, while 36 percent approve, with 9 percent undecided. Thirty-six percent said it makes no difference to them in their vote for a member of Congress whether he or she supported the health care measure, while 38 percent said they'd be less likely to vote for that lawmaker and 22 percent said it would be more likely. "Given Ohio's key position in the Electoral College, the White House needs to keep a sharp eye on the President's numbers in the Buckeye State," said Quinnipiac's Peter Brown. "They aren't awful, but they aren't good either."

Oklahoma

Rasmussen Reports, July 28

2008 election: McCain 66 percent, Obama 34 percent

Rasmussen says 65 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 55 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 36 percent approve. Sixty-seven percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 58 percent "strongly" in favor) while 38 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Seventy-three percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 19 percent are opposed, with 8 percent undecided. Sixty-seven percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law while 24 percent agree, with 9 percent undecided.

Oregon
Rasmussen Reports, July 26

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 40 percent

Rasmussen says 52 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 43 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 48 percent approve. Forty-eight percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law while 47 percent oppose doing so, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-nine percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 30 percent are opposed, with 11 percent undecided. Fifty-five percent disagree with the Justice Department's decision to sue Arizona over the law while 33 percent agree, with 12 percent undecided.

Pennsylvania

Rasmussen Reports, July 28; Quinnipiac University, July 6-11

2008 election: Obama 54 percent, McCain 44 percent

Rasmussen says 54 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 45 percent "strongly" disapproving while 46 percent approve.

Quinnipiac says 49 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing while 46 percent approve, with 5 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by 53 percent to 40 percent, with 8 percent undecided. Forty-seven percent would like to see Pennsylvania enact an immigration law similar to the one in Arizona while 34 percent are opposed, with 19 percent undecided. Forty-eight percent say Obama does not deserve to be re-elected while 42 percent believe he does, with 10 percent undecided. Independents don't believe he deserves to be elected by 51 percent to 35 percent, with 14 percent undecided. But part of voter sentiment is riding on who Obama's opponent would be. If the 2012 presidential election were being held now, 41 percent say they'd vote for whoever is the Republican while 40 percent would back Obama, with 12 percent saying it depends on who the GOP candidate is, while 7 percent are undecided. Voters disapprove of Obama's handling of the economy by 55 percent to 40 percent, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent disapprove of the new health care reform law while 37 percent support it, with 9 percent undecided.

PPP says 50 percent disapprove of Obama's performance while 43 percent approve with 7 percent undecided. Independents disapprove by a 61 percent to 32 percent margin, with 7 percent undecided. Fifty-one percent disapprove of the health care reform measure he signed into law while 40 percent approve, with 10 percent undecided. Fifty percent oppose enacting an Arizona-like immigration law while 35 percent favor doing so, with 15 percent undecided.

Rhode Island

Rasmussen Reports, July 21

2008 election: Obama 63 percent, McCain 35 percent

Rasmussen says voters are divided at 50 percent each as to whether or not they approve of Obama's performance. Forty-nine percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law while 45 percent are opposed, with 6 percent undecided. Fifty-three percent support enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 36 percent are opposed, with 12 percent undecided. Fifty percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law, while 41 percent agree and 9 percent are undecided.

South Carolina

Rasmussen Reports, July 29

2008 election: McCain 54 percent, Obama 45 percent
Rasmussen says 58 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 48 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 40 percent approve. Sixty-one percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 52 percent "strongly" in favor) while 34 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Fifty-nine percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 20 percent are opposed, with 21 percent undecided. Fifty-four percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law while 27 percent agree, with 19 percent undecided.

South Dakota
Rasmussen Reports, July 6

2008 election: McCain 53 percent, Obama 45 percent

Rasmussen says 59 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 46 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 40 percent approve. Sixty-two percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 49 percent "strongly" in favor) while 34 percent are opposed, with 4 percent undecided. Sixty-eight percent back enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 19 percent are opposed, with 12 percent undecided.

Tennessee

Rasmussen Reports
, June 15

2008 elections: McCain 57 percent, Obama 42 percent

Rasmussen says 57 percent disapprove of the job Obama is doing (with 47 percent "strongly" disapproving), while 42 percent approve. Sixty-three percent favor the repeal of the new health care reform law (with 55 percent "strongly" in favor) while 40 percent do not, with 7 percent undecided. Sixty percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 19 percent do not, with 21 percent undecided.

Texas
Rasmussen Reports, July 13

2008 election: McCain 55 percent, Obama 44 percent

Rasmussen says 63 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 56 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 37 percent approve. Sixty-six percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 55 percent "strongly" in favor) while 30 percent are opposed, with 3 percent undecided. Sixty-four percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over its immigration law while 28 percent agree, with 9 percent undecided.

Utah
Rasmussen Reports, June 23

2008 election: McCain 62 percent, Obama 34 percent
Rasmussen says 63 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 50 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 33 percent approve. Sixty-six percent want to repeal the new health care reform law (with 56 percent "strongly" in favor of doing so while 30 percent are opposed, with 4 percent undecided. Fifty-eight percent back enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 25 percent are opposed, with 16 percent undecided.

Vermont

Rasmussen Reports, June 17

2008 elections: Obama 67 percent, McCain 30 percent

Rasmussen says 62 percent approve of Obama's performance (with 40 percent "strongly" approving) while 37 percent do not. Fifty-two percent are opposed to repeal of the new health care law (with 41 percent "strongly" opposed) while 41 percent favor doing so, with 7 percent undecided.

Virginia
Rasmussen Reports, July 18

2008 election: Obama 53 percent, McCain 46 percent

Rasmussen says 50 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 40 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 49 percent approve. Fifty-six percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 42 percent "strongly" in favor) while 41 percent are opposed. Fifty-one percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 34 percent are opposed, with 15 percent undecided. Forty-eight percent disagree with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law while 38 percent agree, with 14 percent undecided.

Washington State

Public Policy Polling, July 27-Aug. 1; Rasmussen Reports, July 28

2008 election: Obama 57 percent, McCain 40 percent

Rasmussen says 50 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 49 percent disapprove.

PPP says 49 percent approve of Obama's performance while 47 percent disapprove, with 4 percent undecided. Independents disapprove of the job he is doing by a 53 percent to 41 percent margin, with 6 percent undecided. Forty-seven percent oppose the health care plan he signed into law while 45 percent support it, with 8 percent undecided.

West Virginia

Rasmussen Reports
, July 22

Election 2008: McCain 56 percent, Obama 43 percent

Rasmussen says 67 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 55 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 32 percent approve. Sixty-four percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 52 percent "strongly" in favor while 30 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Sixty-five percent favor enactment of an Arizona-like immigration law while 20 percent are opposed, with 15 percent undecided. Voters disagree by a similar margin with the Justice Department decision to sue Arizona over the law.

Wisconsin

Rasmussen Reports, July 27

2008 election: Obama 56 percent, McCain 42 percent

Rasmussen says that 51 percent approve of the job Obama is doing while 48 percent disapprove.

Wyoming

Rasmussen Reports, June 22

2008 election: McCain 65 percent, Obama 33 percent

Rasmussen says 70 percent disapprove of Obama's performance (with 57 percent "strongly" disapproving) while 30 percent approve. Sixty-eight percent favor repeal of the new health care reform law (with 57 percent "strongly" in favor) while 28 percent are opposed, with 5 percent undecided. Seventy percent favor enactment of an Arizona-style immigration law while 21 percent are opposed, with 8 percent undecided.
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54 Comments

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STEVE

Strangely, I can't find Arizon's numbers in this poll. Why?

August 13 2010 at 3:43 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
Michael

Growing government is naturally more popular in parasite districts than in host districts.

In nature, hosts can live without parasites. The converse is more difficult to make "sustainable" as our President is so fond of using as a phrasing prop.

August 10 2010 at 8:29 PM Report abuse +16 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Michael's comment
ialbel

This is why we have the electoral college. So that the biggest states can't bully the smaller states.
Once more is going out than coming in (today) and it is not going to those who produce we have ceased to be viable.
Does Atlas Shrug?

August 11 2010 at 3:31 PM Report abuse +11 rate up rate down Reply
sandyoff

We are truly upset with the figures representing Wisconsin residents! From what we hear, there are very few people in support of President Obama's health care plan. We also strongly urge our government to support the border states so as to not give free health care and everything else given to the illegals. We work very hard for everything living and do not support giving free aid to people who have not earned the right to be in our country.

August 10 2010 at 12:41 PM Report abuse +24 rate up rate down Reply
Hello Richard

the deregulation politics going back to Reagan went to far. Responsible companies, and business leaders will weigh risk against reward ant try to make the best business decisions they can. But there are unscrupulous people that will try and cheat the system. Such as happened with Heron, and Bernie Madoff, and with many of the sub prime loan crooks. Some of the actions of credit card companies were abusive. Yes, President Obama and the Congress has added new regulations. They are clearly intended to protect the public, not hurt companies. And Elizabeth Warren would make a great head of the new Consumer financial protection agency.

August 09 2010 at 9:51 PM Report abuse -25 rate up rate down Reply
2 replies to Hello Richard's comment
jlittle770

The deregulation was done by Jimmy Carter! Get the facts straight please. And as for the sub prime loan crooks, they were just a part of the bounty that came in when Clinton opened up the gates for everyone to be a homeowner.. even those that couldn't afford one but got it.

August 11 2010 at 12:03 PM Report abuse +17 rate up rate down Reply
snosnake18

The only people this president whants to help are all parasites working people are out of luck he is a liberal and liberals use working people to pay taxes to support their liberal agenda

August 12 2010 at 9:29 PM Report abuse +12 rate up rate down Reply
Hello Richard

If tax's go up it is due to how the tax cuts were enacted back in 2003/2003. The tax cuts were voted in with an expiration date 2011. President Obama and the current Congress want to extend the tax cuts for all but the very top 2%. BUT the GOP members in congress are blocking any action that doesn't also include the very wealthiest. If tax's go up at the end of this year for anyone other than those making 250.000 or more, thank GWB and the obstructionist Republicans in Congress today.

August 09 2010 at 9:18 PM Report abuse -27 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Hello Richard's comment
ialbel

Yeah, right. You can't have it both ways. If taxes go up blame the Reps. If taxes don't go up it is Obama's doing. Isn't the tax cut we are discussing a Rep tax cut?
Do not trust those who demonize business as evil while they teach, write, govern, organize, or whatever they do insted of workihg in a business that must produce profits to exist. The wealthiest are the ones who make business go. They drive the machine. The government can't run anything efficiently. They never improvise or innovate. They have rules and regulations. They produce nothing and they create no wealth. They have to tax those who do produce or they have no reason for existing. The government is full of leeches ... I know I am generalizing, but you tell me how many are not just clock punchers waiting for retirement. There is no survival of the fittest in the government jungle ... there are no failings ...go along to get along is the mode ... don't lose the pension or benefits. This is the problem with collectives or anything done for the whole. Utopias have failed in history because there is no need to excel. They failed here and they failed everywhere else as well. Public service sounds good, but also has been a means to amassing wealth just as some business people have done. Human nature is the lowest common denominator.
So, business is the goose that lays the golden eggs. This administration has promised all the goose parts to their constituents. Looks like we will all have no eggs and we may go hungry because we had one big meal!

August 11 2010 at 3:17 PM Report abuse +21 rate up rate down Reply
JIM

I am sure that there is enough blame to go around for the entire political class. There has been increasing economic risk since the pols realized that they could buy votes with both your and your children's money by spending more than they could tax, borrowing money that you have to pay back, or printing money and therefore making your wealth worth less. If anyone else did this sort of thing they would have to go to jail. Our leaders are making Madoff look like a small time hood. If you add in the unfunded liabilities on the Federal, State, and local levels the amounts are astronomical. All of our leaders are criminals and the ones that have been there the longest are the worst of the lot.

August 09 2010 at 6:35 PM Report abuse +24 rate up rate down Reply
Hello Richard

Well the democrats have two (not so secret)weapons for the upcoming elections. GOP chairman Steele, and the tea party. Let's not forget that the GOP wants to apologize to BP due to the President expecting them to pay for their own mess. The GOP is also blocking health benefits for ground zero responders. And with Rand Paul in KY, Sharon Angle in NV, and the Florida race, the democrats are likely to keep control of the Senate. There a quite a few races across the county where the tea party and the GOP is battling. This will impact who wins in some of these races.

August 09 2010 at 5:44 PM Report abuse -23 rate up rate down Reply
thebear00

I have lived to see 13 different Presidents. Granted, three where when I was young. However, the current President is the worse of the 13. I believed that Jimmy Carter was the worst but no longer. The current President has no clue as what to do about the economy. Rasie Taxes! In a recession,that is worst action you can take economically. There is no incentive to hire anyone as there is not a business person that knows or trust what this administration is doing or going to do to the economy.

Also, this President has never held a job that envolved business decisions; therefore, no leadership or understanding.

Thank you for reading.

August 09 2010 at 5:39 PM Report abuse +33 rate up rate down Reply
yankyank19548

you voted for obama and gov strickland now you see what you got NOTHING

August 09 2010 at 5:35 PM Report abuse +30 rate up rate down Reply
dcntomc

This is no surprize! The states that voted for McCain disapprove of him the states that voted for him, approve of him. You don't need a poll to figure this out. Obama could find the cure for cancer and establish world peace and his detractors would still disapprove. How sad that the people on both sides of the issues are more interested in pushing their own agendas rather than coming together for the common good. We have become the Red States of America and the Blue States of America. What the Civil War prevented, political ideology is attaining. Sad, very sad!

August 09 2010 at 3:57 PM Report abuse -33 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to dcntomc's comment
ialbel

Your comments are sad. We have a man of color in the White House. No excuses anymore. Get a job, go to work, make it happen. Don't put your hand out for a few pieces of silver. Stop crying about your lot in life. It is your life. Write your own story. Be the hero and not the victim. Stp worrying about what others have. Be a man.
Realize that the man in the White House can't possibly give everything away. He doesn't own it and those that do are not going quietly into the night. If you want to go on some altruistic mission take it to a country where the people have nothing. Show them how to make tools. Show them how to build things. Take them into the 21st century and out of their huts and poverty/. Where is your courage to do something noble?

August 11 2010 at 3:25 PM Report abuse +17 rate up rate down Reply

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